Book

Becoming Tongan: an ethnography of childhood

University of Hawai'i PressHonolulu • Published In 1996 • Pages:

By: Lee, Helen Morton.

Abstract
This document, aptly subtitled 'an ethnography of childhood', is a study of the various socio-cultural factors that are operational in the socialization of children from birth to late adolescence in order to become an adult member of Tongan society. After a brief discussion of some of the theoretical concepts utilized in this study, Lee (Morton) then presents a detailed description of some of the major the factors noted above, such as: ANGA FAKATONGA ('the Tongan way'), the concept of what constitues the ideal individual; Tongan notions of 'personhood' with its cultural values of 'OFA (love, concern), respect, obedience, and independence, and the availability and acquisition of this knowledge by children; physical punishment in children's socialization; and the management of emotion. The work concludes with the author's analysis of childhood socialization processes in reference to recent (ca. 1979-1989) political developments in Tonga.
Subjects
Drives and emotions
Social personality
Personality traits
Acculturation and culture contact
Sociocultural trends
Ethos
Norms
Cultural identity and pride
Humor
Gender status
Ethics
Household
Family relationships
Ethnopsychology
Ethnosociology
Conception
Infant care
Child care
Childhood activities
Socialization
Gender roles and issues
culture
Tongans
HRAF PubDate
2006
Region
Oceania
Sub Region
Polynesia
Document Type
Book
Evaluation
Ethnologist-5
Analyst
John Beierle; 2004
Coverage Date
ca. 1950s-1989
Coverage Place
Villaage of Holonga, Tongatapu Island, Tonga
Notes
Helen Morton
Includes bibliographical references (p.305-337) and index
LCCN
95041374
LCSH
Tongans