Book

Apache reservation: indigenous peoples and the American state

University of Texas PressAustin, Tx • Published In 1993 • Pages:

By: Perry, Richard John.

Abstract
This monograph explores the broad processes that produced the reservation system in the United States through the examination of the history of one Native American population -- the San Carlos Apache of Arizona. Perry states that '…a reservation is a nexus of relationships between a small indigenous population and the global system that encompasses them. Every reservation is unique in many ways, but in some respects the history of San Carlos is a history of United States Indian policies, with their daunting complexities and implications, acted out in southeastern Arizona' (p.ix). As a further amplification of this general thesis the author describes the origins of the Apache in the Southwest, and their relations with the Spanish and American states. He then continues with a discussion of Apache life in the nineteenth century, and on the San Carlos reservation in the mid twentieth, the political economy of San Carlos, and concludes with a chapter entitled 'Trajectories and Trends' in which present and future potentialities of the reservations are explored.
culture
Western Apache
HRAF PubDate
2002
Region
North America
Sub Region
Southwest and Basin
Document Type
Book
Evaluation
Ethnologist-4,5
Analyst
John Beierle ; 2000
Coverage Date
nineteenth century - 1980s
Coverage Place
San Carlos Apache, east central Arizona, United States
Notes
Richard J. Perry
Includes bibliographical references (p. 235-249) and index
LCCN
92037253
LCSH
Western Apache Indians