book chapter

Irrigation agriculture and Navaho community

American anthropologist, n.s.47 • Published In 1945 • Pages: 262-277

By: Goldfrank, Esther Schiff.

Abstract
This is a strong argument for the theory that the Navajo have been sedentary agriculturists since historic times. Pursuing this thesis, the author, an anthropologist, discusses the degree of community cooperation and the emergence of leaders as a result of farming and the control of flood waters for irrigation. Where agriculture was established, she finds, cooperation under respected leaders occurred. Consequently, she joins with other applied anthropologists in urging government agencies to 'recognize again 'those weighty substantial men' in whom authority and control are vested - the local headmen, the community leaders.
Subjects
Internal migration
Prehistory
History
Pastoral activities
Tillage
Water supply
Mutual aid
Community structure
Community heads
Disasters
culture
Navajo
HRAF PubDate
2004
Region
North America
Sub Region
Southwest and Basin
Document Type
book chapter
Evaluation
Creator Type
Ethnologist
Document Rating
3: Good, useful data, but not uniformly excellent
Analyst
Katchen S. Coley ; 1951-1953
Coverage Date
900-1941
Coverage Place
Arizona, New Mexico, Utah, United States
Notes
Esther S. Goldfrank
This document consists of excerpts
Includes bibliographical references (p. 275-277)
LCCN
1715424
LCSH
Navajo Indians