essay

Adaptation and cultural persistence among the Crow Indians of Montana

political organization of native north americansWashington, D.C. • Published In 1980 • Pages: 163-187

By: Voget, Fred W..

Abstract
The author attributes Crow cultural persistence in the face of powerful assimilative pressures during the 20th century to the combined effects of five conditions: 1) possession of a homeland, lending a sense of identity as a people; 2) a local economy permitting both maintenance of social reciprocity among kin and attainment of traditional statuses; 3) religious ceremonies reinforcing the social system and activating a sense of identity through traditional forms and procedures; 4) a philosophy of causality bringing meaning to native religious forms and procedures; 5) a living language.
Subjects
Cultural identity and pride
Functional and adaptational interpretations
Acculturation and culture contact
Inter-ethnic relations
Research and development
External trade
Internal trade
Community structure
Annual cycle
Family relationships
Localized kin groups
Community heads
Community councils
Revelation and divination
Prayers and sacrifices
Status, role, and prestige
Accumulation of wealth
culture
Crow
HRAF PubDate
2014
Region
North America
Sub Region
Plains and Plateau
Document Type
essay
Evaluation
Anthropologist -4, 5
Analyst
Teferi A. Adem; 2012
Coverage Date
1941-1980
Coverage Place
Crow Reservation, Montana, United States
Notes
Fred W. Voget
Includes bibliographical references (185-187)
LCCN
79003715
LCSH
Crow Indians