essay

The Fox of Iowa

acculturation in seven american indian tribesGloucester, Mass. • Published In 1963 • Pages: 259-332

By: Joffe, Natalie Frankel.

Abstract
This source is a chapter from a book on acculturation. It compares the aboriginal, contact and post-contact conditions of the Fox in a number of areas, including material culture and subsistence, social and political organization, religion, and relations with other Indian and Euro-American groups. It also discusses warfare, history, the acculturation process, the community, schools, leisure time activities, and arts and crafts. Joffe concludes that the Fox tribe's strong in-group feeling and solidarity are largely responsible for their current life-style and ability to mutually coexist with Euro-American neighbors while maintaining their own traditions. Besides Euro-American technology, the Fox have had little interest in Euro-American institutions, and their traditional religion and social organization have persisted.
Subjects
Acculturation and culture contact
Sociocultural trends
Gift giving
Adoption
Burial practices and funerals
Clans
Sacred objects and places
Public welfare
External relations
Sorcery
Congregations
culture
Fox
HRAF PubDate
2014
Region
North America
Sub Region
Eastern Woodlands
Document Type
essay
Evaluation
Ethnologist-4,5
Analyst
Martin Malone ; 1977
Coverage Date
1670-1937
Coverage Place
Tama County, Iowa, United States
Notes
Natalie F. Joffe
Reprint of 1940 edition (published by American Anthropological Association). Preface by Ralph Linton
LCCN
40003756
LCSH
Fox Indians--Iowa