Book

Chinatown: the socioeconomic potential of an urban enclave

Temple University PressPhiladelphia, Pa. • Published In 1992 • Pages: xxiv, 275

By: Zhou, Min.

Abstract
The focus in this book is on the experience of recent (late 1980s) immigrant Chinese in New York City's Chinatown and how networks of the ethnic community facilitate their social mobility (p. xvii). This document also describes how Chinatown is understood by immigrant Chinese as a positive means of adaptation to their new country. Zhou analyzes and synthesizes much material from the U.S. census, bringing these data to bear on both theoretical and practical issues involving the mode of adaptation of the Chinese immigrants in the United States. The study consists of nine chapters, dealing with the author's methodology, the early history of Chinese immigration to the United States, changes in recent immigration patterns, the post-1965 immigration period, Chinatown's economic system, the male ethnic labor force in New York City, women in the labor force, the decentralization of Chinatown and residential mobilty of immigrant Chinese, and a summary of Zhou's results, highlighting how these findings fit into theoretical debates concerning immigrant incorporation.
Subjects
External migration
Food service industries
Special clothing industries
Settlement patterns
Labor supply and employment
Ethnic stratification
culture
Chinese Americans
HRAF PubDate
1995
Region
North America
Sub Region
Regional, Ethnic and Diaspora Cultures
Document Type
Book
Evaluation
Sociologist-4,5
Analyst
John Beierle
Coverage Date
Variable
Coverage Place
New York, N.Y., United States
Notes
Min Zhou ; foreword by Alejandro Portes
Includes bibliographical references (p. 251-263) and index
LCCN
91028649
LCSH
Chinese Americans