Book

Hunters in the barrens: the Naskapi on the edge of the White Man's world

Memorial University of Newfoundland (12) • Published In 1973 • Pages: 11, 130

By: Henriksen, Georg.

Abstract
This study of the Davis Inlet Naskapi explores the discontinuities between their life in winter hunting camps and their summer life in a village dominated by a missionary and, to a lesser extent, a government storekeeper. He details the annual round, comparing hunting and social life in camps with the social life in the village where the economy is a mixture of fishing and welfare income. He argues that the traditional values focused on sharing of game, allowing good hunters to exchange products of the hunt for prestige and ensuring an equal distribution of food among the group. In contrast, the monetized economy has disrupted traditional patterns and values, leading to conflict and confusion. The author's analysis of interpersonal relations includes intragroup group relations as well as individual relations with the missionary and the storekeeper.
Subjects
Hunting and trapping
Community structure
Cultural participation
Functional and adaptational interpretations
Sociocultural trends
Missions
Public welfare
Annual cycle
Travel
Kin relationships
Acculturation and culture contact
culture
Innu
HRAF PubDate
2009
Region
North America
Sub Region
Arctic and Subarctic
Document Type
Book
Evaluation
Ethnographer-5
Analyst
Eleanor C. Swanson ; 1977-1978
Coverage Date
1900-1973
Coverage Place
Davis Inlet, Newfound and Labrador province, Canada
Notes
Georg Henriksen
Includes bibliographical references (p. [123]-126)
LCCN
74168527
LCSH
Innu Indians