Book

These mountains are our sacred places: the story of the Stoney Indians

Samuel-StevensToronto, Ontario, Canada • Published In 1977 • Pages:

By: Snow, John.

Abstract
This is a history of the Stoney people living in and around the Morley Reserve, west of Calgary, Alberta. It is a description of their way of life prior to white contact and the 100 years following the signing of Treaty No. 7 in 1876. The author is a Stoney Chief, ordained minister in the United Church of Canada, and great-great grandson of one of the signatories of the original treaty. This 100-year history is a carefully researched case against the federal and provincial governments for their failure to honor the original treaty. Snow recounts the band's failed attempt to get land in the Kootenay Plains, which was eventually flooded by a hydroelectric project. Snow tells his own life history and the contemporary pan-tribal ecumenical movement. Royalties from underlying gas reserves have brought affluence to the band after years of poverty and failed government programs, spawning a cultural revitalization movement. See document no. 6 in the the Quinault file for a similar indigenous history in support of tribal land claims.
Subjects
Reviews and critiques
Life history materials
Internal migration
Acculturation and culture contact
Real property
Community heads
External relations
Public welfare
Religious denominations
culture
Stoney
HRAF PubDate
2002
Region
North America
Sub Region
Plains and Plateau
Document Type
Book
Evaluation
Indigene-4,5
Analyst
Ian Skoggard ; 2001
Coverage Date
1876-1977
Coverage Place
Morley Reserve, Alberta, Canada
Notes
By Chief John Snow
Includes bibliographical references
LCCN
77081413
LCSH
Assiniboine Indians