Book

The Fort Belknap Assiniboine of Montana

[s.n.]Philadelphia • Published In 1938 • Pages:

By: Rodnick, David, United States. Bureau Of Indian Affairs.

Abstract
In this dissertation, Rodnick chronicles the loss of Assiniboine culture. The Assiniboine are the most northerly extension of Sioux-speaking people on the Great Plains. They signed the Fort Laramie treaty in 1851 and permanently settled on Fort Belknap Reservation in 1888 after the near extinction of the buffalo forced them to change their way of life. In the 1890s, compulsory education, wage labor, farming, and stock raising began a period of assimilation. The total failure of farming and ranching left the Assiniboine impoverished by the 1930s. Rodnick describes the different dance societies and relates several Assiniboine life histories.
Subjects
Individuation and mobility
Sodalities
Marriage
Religious practices
culture
Assiniboine
HRAF PubDate
2002
Region
North America
Sub Region
Plains and Plateau
Document Type
Book
Evaluation
Creator Type
Ethnologist
Document Rating
4: Excellent Secondary Data
5: Excellent Primary Data
Analyst
Ian Skoggard ; 2000
Coverage Date
1640-1935
Coverage Place
Montana, United States
Notes
[by] David Rodnick
'A study for the Applied Anthropology Unit of the United States Indian Service, Department of the Interior.'
Mimeographied
Includes bibliographical references
Thesis (Ph. D.) -- University of Pennsylvania, 1936
LCCN
38008787
LCSH
Assiniboine Indians