essay

Inverted sacrifice

circumpolar religion and ecology : an anthropology of the northTokyo • Published In 1994 • Pages: 253-271

By: Sharp, Henry S..

Abstract
In this paper, Sharp examines Chipewyan hunting practices and beliefs as a form of 'inverted' sacrifice, in which the animal offers itself to the human hunter. The Chipewyans believe that a successful kill could only occur if an animal gives itself to the hunter. This 'luck' is associated with dreams in which hunters learn from animal spirits where to find animals. The Chipewyan idea of INKONZE, or supernatural power, invokes the unity of all beings, humans and animals, and the reciprocity that exists between them. Sharp examines the broader literature on sacrifice, which according to him is based on a hierarchical, dualistic, and mechanical model of the universe, one not shared by the Chipewyan.
Subjects
Hunting and trapping
Cosmology
Sacred objects and places
Ethnozoology
culture
Chipewyans
HRAF PubDate
2000
Region
North America
Sub Region
Arctic and Subarctic
Document Type
essay
Evaluation
Ethnologist-5
Analyst
Ian Skoggard ; 1999
Coverage Date
1965-1985
Coverage Place
north-central Canada
Notes
Henry S. Sharp
Includes bibliographical references (p. 270-271)
LCCN
95127754
LCSH
Chipewyan Indians