Book

Vancouver's Chinatown: racial discourse in Canada, 1875-1980

McGill-Queen's PressMontreal, Québec • Published In 1991 • Pages: x, 323

By: Anderson, Kay.

Abstract
This is a systematic analysis of the relationships between Vancouver's Chinese and European communities from the late 1880s to about 1980. The data focus on immigration policies of the Canadian government and the numerous forms of discrimination to which the Chinese immigrants were subjected from their earliest settlements in Vancouver to ca. 1980. Chapter 1 presents a general exposition of the idea of 'race', while Chapters 2-7, arranged in chronological order from 1875 to 1980, deal with the development of the racial category 'Chinese', by the Canadian government, the concept of Chinatown as viewed through the European imagination, the exploitation of the race idea in British Columbia and its implications for government practices, urban renewal and revitalization of the Chinatown area, and the development of radically new forms of neighborhood targeting that took place in the 1970s.
Subjects
External migration
History and culture change
Settlements
Mercantile business
Labor
Ethnic stratification
Illegal entertainment
Citizenship
Taxation and public income
Government regulation
Elections
culture
Chinese Canadians
HRAF PubDate
1995
Region
North America
Sub Region
Regional, Ethnic and Diaspora Cultures
Document Type
Book
Evaluation
Geographer-4
Analyst
John Beierle, 1994
Coverage Date
variable, 1875-1980
Coverage Place
Vancouver, B.C., Canada
Notes
Kay J. Anderson
Includes bibliographical references (p. [293]-310) and index
LCCN
c910902232
LCSH
Chinese Canadians