article

Postcontact Koniag ceremonialism on Kodiak Island and the Alaskan Peninsula: evidence from the Fisher Collection

Arctic anthropology29 (1) • Published In 1992 • Pages: 18-37

By: Crowell, Aron.

Abstract
Late nineteenth century dance masks, beaded headdresses, and other ceremonial articles from Kodiak Island and the Alaska Peninsula provide evidence for the extended postcontact continuity of Koniag religious beliefs and shamanic practices. Objects were selected for study from the large and well-documented William J. Fisher collection at the National Museum of Natural History. Postcontact innovation in the styles, media, and uses of ceremonial art are discussed on the basis of the Fisher materials. Results included documentation of a Koniag hunting ritual similar to the 'Doll Ceremony' of the mainland Alaskan Yupik. Sources employed in the description and interpretation of the objects include Fisher's field catalogs and correspondence, ethnographic and historical records, recent archaeological research, linguistic analysis, and material studies (p. 18).
Subjects
Reviews and critiques
Recording and collecting in the field
Historical and archival research
Artifact and archive collections
Acculturation and culture contact
Sociocultural trends
Special garments
External trade
Visual arts
Musical instruments
Shamans and psychotherapists
Organized ceremonial
culture
Alutiiq
HRAF PubDate
2005
Region
North America
Sub Region
Arctic and Subarctic
Document Type
article
Evaluation
Ethnologist-4
Analyst
John Beierle ; 2004
Coverage Date
1780s-1884
Coverage Place
Koniag Eskimo, Kodiak Island and the Alaskan Peninsula, Alaska, United States
Notes
Includes bibliographical references (p. 34-37)
LCCN
sf 78000711
LCSH
Koniagmiut Eskimos