Book

Wax & gold: tradition and innovation in Ethiopian culture

University of Chicago PressChicago • Published In 1965 • Pages:

By: Levine, Donald Nathan.

Abstract
In this book Levine analyzes traditional and transitional Amhara culture from four different vantages: historical, sociological, anthropological and psychological. Each aspect of traditional culture touched on by the author is considered in light of Ethiopia's transition to a modern state. The problems facing Ethiopia as a developing nation are pointed out and some suggestions are made concerning their solution. Examined in depth are the roles of Amhara peasants, elites, intellectuals, adolescents, clergy and military. The education and socialization process and the political process are examined extensively to determine in what ways traditional patterns conflict with or contribute to the modernization process. In the last two chapters, the author delves into the psychological development of the Amhara personality. More specifically, these last two chapters are concerned with the personality factors which the author considers inhibitive of creative leadership, solidary action and social progress. Field methods included analysis of literary texts and oral traditions, use of questionnaires, projective tests, interviews and participant observation. Levine spent from 1958 to 1961 carrying out field research, serving part of that time as a lecturer in the University College of Addis Ababa.
Subjects
History
Chief executive
Classes
Adolescent activities
Priesthood
Ethnosociology
Social relationships and groups
culture
Amhara
HRAF PubDate
1998
Region
Africa
Sub Region
Eastern Africa
Document Type
Book
Evaluation
Creator Type
Sociologist
Document Rating
4: Excellent Secondary Data
5: Excellent Primary Data
Analyst
Helen Gunsher Bornstein ; John Beierle ; 1972
Coverage Date
1270-1961
Coverage Place
Ethiopia
Notes
Donald N. Levine
Includes bibliographical references (p. 287-302)
LCCN
65018340
LCSH
Amhara (African people)