Book

Elizabethans at home

Stanford University PressStanford, Calif. • Published In 1957 • Pages:

By: Pearson, Lu Emily.

Abstract
This source presents a highly detailed and uniformly excellent study of social life and social organization in the Elizabethan period, with variations noted for class, religious, and rural-urban differences. The author synthesizes data from a wide range of source materials, varying from contemporary Elizabethan writings to modern studies of the period. (There is some resort to early Stuart period writings and history, indexed as Comparative Materials and/or Sociocultural Trends where pertinent.) Much of the information in the source relevant to social life and organization is contained in chapters dealing with the house and gardens, household and family relationships, education, marriage and the establishment of a family and household, changes in the family brought about by a death, and, perhaps most interestingly of all for the general reader, a chapter devoted to the various interests and leisure time activities of the Elizabethans, such as games, sports, and other forms of entertainment, music and dancing, holiday activities, food and meals, clothing styles, and toilet. Political behavior and church-state relations are only lightly covered.
Subjects
Dwellings
Grounds
Furniture
Heating and lighting equipment
Domestic service
Standard of living
Rest days and holidays
Literature
Ethics
Gender status
Classes
Ethics
Basis of marriage
Arranging a marriage
Nuptials
Household
Family relationships
Dying
Social readjustments to death
Transmission of cultural norms
Education system
Elementary education
Educational theory and methods
culture
British (1485-1603)
Region
Europe
Sub Region
British Isles
Document Type
Book
Evaluation
Historian-4
Analyst
John Beierle; 1977
Coverage Date
1558-1603
Coverage Place
England and Wales, United Kingdom
Notes
by Lu Emily Pearson
Titles of chapters in this source are: I Homes and gardens; II Fathers and mothers; III Education of children; IV Sons and daughters; V Preparation for marriage; VI Founding and maintaining the home; VII Changes wrought by death; VIII Elizabethans at home; bibliography; index.
Information on Elizabethan social life, derived from or illustrated in contemporary Elizabethan literature or the so-called “conduct books” of the period, has been marked for category 538 plus whatever other substantive categories that may apply. For example, a “conduct book” dealing with the “proper” education of a young woman would be marked for category 538 in addition to 871 for education, and 562 for sex status.
Includes bibliographical references (p. 611-623)
LCCN
57009305
LCSH
England--Social life and customs--16th century