Collection Description

Culture Name

Palestinians

Culture Description

Palestinians are Arabs who are a mixture of pre-Israelite and other groups who settled in Palestine. They speak a dialect of Arabic and write classical Arabic. Until 1948 the country of Palestine occupied an area east of the Mediterranean that is now occupied by Israel and Jordan. The creation of the state of Israel created hundreds of thousands of Palestinian refugees.

Note

Select the Culture Summary link above for a longer description of the culture.

Region

Middle East --Middle East

Countries

Gaza Strip

Israel

Jordan

Lebanon

West Bank

OWC Code

M013

Number of Documents

40

Note: Select the Collection Documents tab above to browse documents.

Number of Pages

5777

Collection Overview

Documents referred to in this section are included in the eHRAF collection and are referenced by author, date of publication, and eHRAF document number.

There are 39 documents in the eHRAF Palestinians file of which 18 are books and the rest are articles. The time period covered by the documents in this file is from 1830 to 2000. Only one source was published before the British Mandate period (1917-1948), a short article on place spirits by Baldensperger (1893, document no. 20.) Ten documents were published before 1950, one in the 1960s, six works in the 1970s, and the rest, 23 documents, in the 1990s or later. The classic ethnographies of Arab village life during the British Mandate period are a two-volume set by Granquist (1931, no. 9; 1935, no. 10), who did her fieldwork in the late 1920s and Shimon (1947, no. 8), who covers a period from the turn of the century to 1946. Granquist (1947, no. 16; 1947, no. 17) wrote an additional two-volume monograph on the Arab child, which includes discussions of child-rearing practices and familial relationships. Other work done in this period are by Canaan on spirits (Canaan 1922, no. 11) and shrines (Canaan 1927, no. 18), Haddad (1922, no. 23) on guest houses, and Loftus (1949, no. 25) on illegal Arab immigration. Community studies carried out in the early post-1948 period include Lutfiyya's study of a Palestinian village in Jordan, circa 1960 (Lutfiyya 1966, no. 38), and two studies on Palestinian communities in Israel (Cohen 1972, no. 31; Zureik 1979, no. 54). Rosenfeld wrote a series of articles around this period on social change (Rosenfeld 1968, no. 46), visiting patterns (Rosenfeld 1979, no. 47) and marriage patterns (Rosenfeld 1976, no. 48). Two comprehensive books on more technical subjects are Atran (1986, no. 27) on the Palestinian land tenure system and Moors (1995, no. 40) on women's property. Sayigh (1979, no. 50) has written the classic history of the region from the Palestinian point of view. The rest of the works in the eHRAF collection are published after 1989 and are influenced by the intifada (1987-present). Most of them are based on research conducted in the Occupi ed Territories. Swedenburg (2003, no. 52) examines how elderly freedom fighters remembered the Great Revolt (1936-1939). He also wrote an article on how peasants became the symbol of the national movement. Two books address the relationship between the national, trade, and women's movements (Hilterman 1991, no. 34; Peteet 1991, no. 43). The latter reference (Peteet 1991, no. 43) is the only source in the collection based on research carried out in southern Lebanon. Abdulhadi (1998, no. 26) wrote an article on the women's movement. Other women's issues discussed in context of the resistance are family planning, a book by Kanaaneh (2002, no. 37), and articles on motherhood (Peteet 1997, no. 41) and the wearing of the HAJIB (Hammami 1990, no. 33). Three articles focus on male activist youth, or SHEBAB (Peteet 1994, no. 42; Pitcher 1991, no. 44; Jean-Klein 2000, no. 36). Other articles examine the influence of the resistance on folksongs (Barghouthi 1996, no. 28), religious and secular ceremonies (Bowman 1993, no. 30), identity (Haidar 2001, no. 32), cultural values (Huntington 2001, no. 35), and spirit possession (Rothenberg 2001, no. 49). Three books examine Israeli-Palestinian relations in Israel (Rabinowitz 1996, no. 45; Slyomovics 1998, no. 51) and across the Green Line (Bornstein 2002, no. 29). Finally, Monterescu (2001, no. 39) has written an article on men, manhood, and café life in Jaffa.

For more detailed information on the content of the individual works in the file, see the abstracts in the citations preceding each document.

The culture summary was update in 2003 by Ghada Hashem Talhami. It was originally published in: Encyclopedia of World Cultures, Vol. 9, Africa and the Middle East, edited by John Middleton and Amal Rassam. Boston, Mass.: G. K. Hall & Co: 1995. We thank Julie Peteet for supplying the original bibliography from which we made the final selections. Ian Skoggard wrote the SYNOPSIS and John Beierle and Ian Skoggard wrote the indexing notes, July 2004.

ALWIYA -- districts -- category 634

AQDIYA (QADĀ) -- subdistricts -- category 634

'AYLI -- the family -- category 592

BADĪLA arrangement-- a form of exchange marriage -- category 583

DAQQĀQ -- skilled stone carvers -- categories 324, 463

DARWĪSH -- a religious mystic -- category 791

DAYA -- a midwife -- categories 844, 759

DIWĀN -- a guest house, maintained by one HAMŪLA -- category 344

FALLAH(IN) -- peasants -- category 565

FATWA -- a legal opinion or decree -- category 671

GUPW -- General Union of Palestinian Women -- category 668

HAJIB -- head covering -- categories 291, 292

HAMŪLA -- clan, sometimes referred to as lineage -- cateories 614, 613

HAMA'IL -- see HAMŪLA

HAMAS -- Islamic Resistance Movement -- categories 668, 669

HARA -- the sectional division of a village -- category 621

HISTADRŪT -- a powerful labor organization -- category 467

IMAM -- a Muslim holy man or "priest" -- category 793

Intifada -- uprising -- category 669

JEB -- a patrilineal unit -- category 613

JINN -- spirit -- categories 776, 787

KĀDI -- a Sharia judge -- category 693

KUFIYA -- a head scarf -- category 291

MADĀFAH -- guest house, maintained by the village -- category 344

MAHR -- dower -- category 583

MAJLIS QARAWI -- village councils -- category 623

martyrs -- categories 727, 769

MASHA'A -- see MUSHĀ

memorial books -- category 5310

MUJÂHID(IN)-- freedom fighter -- category 669

MUKHTAR -- village headman -- categories 622, 631

MUSHĀ -- land tenure system -- category 423

MUTASARRIFS -- the governors of the districts -- category 634

NĀTŪR -- crop guards -- categories 624m 625

PLO -- Palestinian Liberation Organization -- category 668

QĀ' IMMAQĀMS -- administrative officers of the sub-districts -- category 634

QASSÂM -- a hero of the 1936 Arab Revolt -- category 769

reconciliation committee -- category 627

refugee camps -- category 727

resistance -- category 668

SHARI'A law -- categories 671, 779

SHEBAB -- male youth activists -- categories 561, 668

subaltern -- category 565

TANKĪT -- the handing over of money gifts to the groom by men, and to the bride by women -- categories 585, 431

THAWRA -- resistance movement -- category 668

TITRĪZ --needlework -- 5311

UNLU -- Unified National Leadership of the Uprising -- categories 646, 668

UNRWA -- United Nations Relief and Work Agency -- categories 648, 747

WĀLI --a woman's legal representative -- category 693

WASĪT -- a marriage go-between -- category 584

WATAN -- home, homeland, nation -- category 186

WWC -- Women's Work Committee -- categories 562, 668

ZĀ' ILA -- the joint family -- category 596

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