Voth, Henry R., 1855-1931. The traditions of the Hopi

Table of Contents

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The Traditions Of The Hopi.

1. Origin Myth. 1

2. Hurúing Wuhti And The Sun. 1

3. Coming Of The Hopi From The Under-world. 1

4. The Wanderings Of The Hopi. 1

5. The Origin Of Some Oraíbi Clans. 1

A. The Spider Clan.

B. The Bear Clan.

6. The Snake Myth. 1

7. The Snake Myth. 1

8. The Wanderings Of The Bear Clan (hon-ñamu). 1

9. The Wanderings Of The Spider Clan (kohkang-ñamu). 3

10. The Origin Of The Yáyaatu Society. 1

11. The Origin Of Some Mishóngnovi Clans. 1

12. The Destruction Of Palátkwapi. 1

13. The Revenge Of The Katcinas. 1

14. How The Circle (póngo) Katcina And His Wife Became Stars. 1

15. The Kokóshori Katcina And The Shongópavi Maiden. 1

16. How Ball-head (tatciqtö) Wedded An Oraíbi Maiden. 1

17. The Ahö́li And Other Wálpi Katcinas. 1

18. The Two War Gods And The Two Maidens. 1

19. The Pöokónghoyas And The Cannibal Monster. 1

20. Pöokónghoya And His Brother As Thieves. 1

21. How The Pö́okongs Destroyed Cóoyoko And His Wife. 1

22. How Pö́okong Killed The Bear. 1

23. The Pö́okongs Attend A Dance. 1

24. How Pöokong Won A Bride. 1

25. How The Antelope Maiden Was Reconciled. 1

26. The Pö́okongs And The Bálölöokong. 1

27. How The Yellow Corn-ear Maiden Became A Bull Snake And Revenged Herself. 2

28. A Journey To The Skeleton House. 1

29. A Journey To The Skeleton House. 1

30. Skeleton Woman And The Hunter. 1

31. Másauwuu Marries A Maiden. 1

32. Másauwuu And The Háno Hunters. 1

33. Two Yáyaponchatu Trade In Oraíbi. 2

34. The Kóhonino Hunter. 2

35. The White Corn-ear Maiden And The Sorcerers. 1

36. Watermelon-rind Woman (hölö́kop Wuhti). 1

37. The Youth And Maiden Who Played Hide And Seek For Their Life. 1

38. The Maiden Who Stole The Youth's Costume. 1

39. The Two Pueblo Maidens Who Were Married To The Night. 1

40. How Hiyónatitiwa Defeated The Plan Of His Enemies. 1

41. The Shongópavi Maiden Who Turned Into A Dog. 1

42. The Blind Man And The Lame Man. 1

43. Big Head And Goat Horn. 1

44. Kavúshkavuwnöm And Shovíviounöm. 2

45. How The Children Of Pivánhonk̆api Obtained Permission To Catch Birds. 1

46. The Jug Boy. 1

47. The Crow As A Spirit Of Evil. 1

48. The Maiden And The Coyote. 1

49. Chórzhvūǩiqölö And The Eagles. 1

50. The Hawk And The Child. 1

51. Mū́yingwa, Two Children, And The Humming-bird. 1

52. The Kalátötö 1 Who Wished To Have Hair On His Head. 2

53. The Child Who Turned Into An Owl. 1

54. The Children And The Lizards. 1

55. The Rooster, The Mocking-bird And The Maiden. 1

56. The Toad And The Snow Katcínas. 1

57. The Locust That Came To Life While Being Roasted. 1

58. The Coyote And The Turtles. 1

59. The Water Serpent And The Coyote. 1

60. The Coyote And The Bálölöokong 1 (water Serpent).

61. Bálölöokongwuu 2 And The Coyote. 3

62. The Coyote And The Frog. 1

63. The Coyote, The Bat, And The Humming-bird. 2

64. The Coyote And The Humming-bird. 1

65. How The Coyote Was Deceived By The Wren. 1

66. The Áahtu 1 And The Coyote. 2

67. The Coyote And The Turtle-dove. 1

68. The Coyote And The Blue Jays. 1

69. The Coyote And The Eagle. 1

70. The Coyote And The Red Eagle. 2

71. The Coyote And The Turkeys. 2

72. The Chíro And The Coyote. 1

73. The Coyote And The Porcupine. 1

74. The Coyote And The Badger. 1

75. The Badger And The Coyote. 1

76. The Badger, The Coyote, And The Kóhonino Maiden. 1

77. The Coyote And The Kókontu Maidens. 1

78. The Coyote And The Grasshoppers. 1

79. The Coyote And The Grasshopper. 1

80. The Three Maidens And The Coyote. 1

81. How The Coyotes Had A Katcina Dance. 1

82. The Coyote And His Prey. 1

83. The Bull-snake And The Tū́chvo 2 (wren).

84. The Snakes And The Locusts. 2

85. The Squirrel And The Chipmunk. 1

86. A Bet Between The Cooyoko And The Fox. 1

87. The Little Gray Mice And The Little Brown Mice. 2

88. The Badger And The Small Gray Mice. 1

89. The Badger And The Small Gray Mice. 1

90. The Mice, The Owl, And The Hawk. 1

91. The Sparrow-hawk And The Hā́kwā. 1

92. The Sparrow-hawk And The Grasshoppers. 2

93. The Crow And The Hawk. 1

94. The Red Eagle Song. 1

95. The Red Eagle And The Owl. 2

96. The Bee And The Asya. 1

97. The Grasshoppers And The Oraíbi Maiden. 1

98. How The Beetles Produced Rain. 1

99. Why The Ants Are So Thin. 1

100. Lā́vövölvipiki And Nö́nvövölpiki. 2

101. The Destruction Of Pivánhonk̆pi. 1

102. The Destruction Of Sikyátki. 1

103. The Destruction Of Aoátovi. 1

104. The Destruction Of Aoátovi. 1

105. How An Oraíbi Chief Punished His People. 1

106. A Katcina Race Contest Between The Wálpi And The Oraíbi. 1

107. The Last Fight With The Navaho. 1

108. A Hopi Raid On A Navaho Dance. 2

109. A Raid On The Hopi Villages. 1

110. The Early Spanish Missions At Oraíbi. 1

Abstracts.

1.—origin Myth.

2.—hurúing Wuhti And The Sun.

3.—coming Of The Hopi From The Under-world.

4.—the Wanderings Of The Hopi.

5.—the Origin Of Some Oraíbi Clans.

6.—the Snake Myth.

7.—the Snake Myth.

8.—the Wanderings Of The Bear Clan.

9.—the Wanderings Of The Spider Clan.

10.—origin Of The Yáyaatu Society.

11.—the Origin Of Some Mishóngnovi Clans.

12.—the Destruction Of Palátkwapi.

13.—the Revenge Of The Katcinas.

14.—how The Circle (póngo) Katcina And His Wife Became Stars.

15.—the Kokóshori Katcina And The Shongópavi Maiden.

16.—how Ball-head (tatciqtö) Wedded An Oraíbi Maiden.

17.—the Áhö́li And Other Wálpi Katcinas.

18.—the Two War Gods And The Two Maidens.

19.—the Pöokónghoyas And The Cannibal Monster.

20. Pöokónghoya And His Brother As Thieves.

21. How The Pö́okongs Destroyed Cóoyoko And His Wife.

22. How Pö́okong Killed The Bear.

23.—the Pö́okongs Attend A Dance.

24.—how Pö́okong Won A Bride.

25.—how The Antelope Maiden Was Reconciled.

26.—the Pö́okongs And The Bálölöokong.

27.—how The Yellow Corn-ear Maiden Became A Bull-snake.

28.—journey To The Skeleton House.

29.—a Journey To The Skeleton House.

30.—skeleton Woman And The Hunter.

31.—másauwuu Marries A Maiden.

32.—másauwuu And The Háno Hunters.

33.—the Two Yáyaponchatu Trade In Oraibi.

34.—the Kóhonino Hunter.

35.—the White Corn-ear Maiden And The Sorcerers.

36.—watermelon-rind Woman (hölö́kopö́ Wuhti).

37.—the Youth And Maiden Who Played Hide And Seek For Their Life.

38.—the Maiden Who Stole The Youth's Costume.

39.—the Two Pueblo Maidens Who Were Married To The Night.

40.—how Hiyónatitiwa Defeated The Plan Of His Enemies.

41.—the Shongópavi Maiden Who Turned Into A Dog.

42.—the Blind Man And The Lame Man.

43.—big Head And Goat Horn.

44.—kavúshkavuwnöm And Shovíviounöm.

45.—how The Children Of Pivánhonk̆api Obtained Permission To Catch Birds.

46.—the Jug Boy.

47.—the Crow As A Spirit Of Evil.

48.—the Maiden And The Coyote.

49.—chórzhūk̆iqölö And The Eagles.

50.—the Hawk And The Child.

51.—mū́yingwa, Two Children, And The Humming-bird.

52.—the Kalátötö Who Wished To Have Hair On His Head.

53.—the Child Who Turned Into An Owl.

54.—the Children And The Lizards.

55.—the Rooster, The Mocking-bird, And The Maiden.

56.—the Toad And The Snow Katcínas.

57.—the Locust That Came To Life While Being Roasted.

58.—the Coyote And The Turtles.

59.—the Water Serpent And The Coyote.

60.—the Coyote And The Bálölöokong (water Serpent).

61.—balölöokongwuu And The Coyote.

62.—the Coyote And The Frog.

63.—the Coyote, The Bat, And The Humming-bird.

64.—the Coyote And The Humming-bird.

65.—how The Coyote Was Deceived By The Wren.

66.—the Áahtu And The Coyote.

67.—the Coyote And The Turtle-dove.

68.—the Coyote And The Blue Jays.

69.—the Coyote And The Eagle.

70.—the Coyote And The Red Eagle.

71.—the Coyote And The Turkeys.

72.—the Chíro And The Coyote.

73.—the Coyote And The Porcupine.

74.—the Coyote And The Badger.

75.—the Badger And The Coyote.

76.—the Badger, The Coyote, And The Kóhonino Maiden.

77.—the Coyote And The Kókontu-maidens.

78.—the Coyote And The Grasshoppers.

79.—the Coyote And The Grasshopper.

80.—the Three Maidens And The Coyote.

81.—how The Coyotes Had A Katcina Dance.

82.—the Coyote And His Prey.

83.—the Bull-snake And The Tū́chvo (wren).

84.—the Snakes And The Locusts.

85.—the Squirrel And The Chipmunk.

86.—a Bet Between The Cóoyoko And The Fox.

87.—the Little Gray Mice And The Little Brown Mice.

88.—the Badger And The Small Gray Mice.

89.—the Badger And The Small Gray Mice.

90.—the Mice, The Owl, And The Hawk.

91.—the Sparrow Hawk And The Hakwa.

92.—the Sparrow Hawk And The Grasshoppers.

93.—the Crow And The Hawk.

94.—the Red Eagle's Song.

95.—the Red Eagle And The Owl.

96.—the Bee And The Ásya.

97.—the Grasshoppers And The Oraíbi Maiden.

98.—how The Beetles Produced Rain.

99.—why The Ants Are So Thin.

100. Lā́vövölvipiki And Nö́nvövölpiki.

101.—the Destruction Of Pivánhonk̆api.

102.—the Destruction Of Sikyátki.

103.—the Destruction Of Aoátovi.

104.—the Destruction Of Aoátovi.

105.—how An Oraibi Chief Punished His People.

106.—a Katcina Race Contest Between The Wálpi And The Oraíbi

107.—the Last Fight With The Navaho.

108.—a Hopi Raid On A Navaho Dance.

109.—a Raid On The Hopi Villages.

110.—the Early Spanish Missions At Oraíbi.

Publication Information

Paragraph Subjects (OCM)

Publication Information The main body of the Publication Information page contains all the metadata that HRAF holds for that document.

Author: Author's name as listed in Library of Congress records

Title: The traditions of the Hopi

Published By: Original publisher Chicago ; [Millwood, N. Y.]: Field Columbian Museum ; [Kraus Reprint]. 1905 [1973]. vii, 319 p.

By line: Author's name as appearing in the actual publication by H. R. Voth

HRAF Publication Information: New Haven, Conn.: Human Relations Area Files, 2019. Computer File

Culture: Culture name from the Outline of World Cultures (OWC) with the alphanumberic OWC identifier in parenthesis. Hopi (NT09)

Subjects: Document-level OCM identifiers given by the anthropology subject indexers at HRAF Literary texts (539); Mythology (773); Traditional history (173); Literature (538); Informants (115);

Abstract: Brief abstract written by HRAF anthropologists who have done the subject indexing for the document Heinrich Voth, the Mennonite missionary who spent almost 10 years among the Hopi and who spoke the Hopi language fluently, compiled this collection of myths, historical traditions, and stories. Most of the tales were collected at Oraibi although there are some from Shipaulovi, and a few from Mishongnovi. Since Voth gives no commentary, there is no indication how the Hopi classified these tales. Following the complete texts, Voth gives abstracts of each tale. In footnotes, Voth gives the name and village of each story-teller.

Document Number: HRAF's in-house numbering system derived from the processing order of documents 10

Document ID: HRAF's unique document identifier. The first part is the OWC identifier and the second part is the document number in three digits. nt09-010

Document Type: May include journal articles, essays, collections of essays, monographs or chapters/parts of monographs. Monograph

Language: Language that the document is written in English

Note: Cross-references have been made for Mythology (773), Traditional History (173) historical traditions, and Literature (538) fiction indicating to researcher the pages on which pertinent material will be found. Story texts and abstracts have been indexed for Literary Texts (539) only. Informants (115) is used for name and village of each story teller. A glossary of native terms has been compiled and will be found in Glossary (104).

Field Date: The date the researcher conducted the fieldwork or archival research that produced the document 1893-1902

Evaluation: In this alphanumeric code, the first part designates the type of person writing the document, e.g. Ethnographer, Missionary, Archaeologist, Folklorist, Linguist, Indigene, and so on. The second part is a ranking done by HRAF anthropologists based on the strength of the source material on a scale of 1 to 5, as follows: 1 - poor; 2 - fair; 3 - good, useful data, but not uniformly excellent; 4 - excellent secondary data; 5 - excellent primary data Missionary-5

Analyst: The HRAF anthropologist who subject indexed the document and prepared other materials for the eHRAF culture/tradition collection. Marlene Martin ; 1975

Coverage Date: The date or dates that the information in the document pertains to (often not the same as the field date). ca.1893-1902

Coverage Place: Location of the research culture or tradition (often a smaller unit such as a band, community, or archaeological site) Oraibi, Shipaulovi, Mishongnoui Pueblos, northeastern Arizona, United States

LCSH: Library of Congress Subject Headings Hopi Indians

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