Collection Description

Culture Name

British (1714-1815)

Culture Description

The British (1714-1815) refers to British culture and society during the period from the accession of George I, and the House of Hanover in 1714, to the Battle of Waterloo in 1815. This was a period of great change, particularly in the rapid development of industry and the growth of cities. The technological and social changes in food production increased the wealth of the aristocracy and created many landless poor forced to look for work in cities. During this period of imperial expansion, Britain was involved in many conflicts around the globe.

Note

Select the Culture Summary link above for a longer description of the culture.

Region

Europe --British Isles

Countries

United Kingdom

OWC Code

ES03

Number of Documents

8

Note: Select the Collection Documents tab above to browse documents.

Number of Pages

3058

Collection Overview

Documents referred to in this section are included in eHRAF World Cultures and are referenced by author, date of publication and eHRAF document number.

In addition to this culture summary, the British: 1714-1815 (Georgian times) collection (ES03) contains documents, all in English. Green (1963, no. 1) and George (1965, no. 2) are the most general introductions to the file. Green is most concerned with political history but provides much general ethnographic information as well. George (1965, no. 2) is specifically concerned with life in eighteenth century London, and it concentrates on the poor and working classes. Campbell (1747, no. 3) is a contemporary (1747) guide to 313 trades and professions practiced in London and was intended to describe them so that parents might choose those appropriate for their children. Ashton (1885, no. 5) is a picture of life during the late eighteenth century (1788-1799) based largely on newspapers of the time. It covers such things as clothing, the military, entertainments, and crime. Sydney (1891, no. 5 and 1891, no. 7) are a two volume social history of eighteenth century England. They contain a series of short chapters on manners and customs, daily life, occupations, and “the general social conditions.” They refer largely to the upper classes and are based for the most part on diaries and personal correspondence. Barfoot & Wilkes (1791, no. 8) is in many ways a precursor of the modern telephone directory. It is a collection of 900 pages of lists including the names, addresses, and professions of London’s citizens; a directory of land and sea transportation; legal institutions and personnel; officers of the Court of St. James; government offices and their locations; banks; medical personnel; and members of the city government. Besant (1902, no. 10) is in many ways like Sydney (1891, no. 5 and 1891, no. 7), but it covers the whole century and is a more comprehensive and serious history. It is also limited just to London. It includes a lengthy political history of eighteenth century London, which is followed by chapters on life in the city, architecture, religion and the church, government, trade, manners and customs, amusements, and crime. Chamberlayne (1729, no. 14) is another contemporary (1729) directory very similar to Barfoot & Wilkes (1791, no. 8), but it covers the whole country and Scotland, and is for the earlier part of the century. It contains information on such topics as class structure, laws, history, weights and measures, and points of interest to travelers. Drummond & Wilbraham (1940, no. 15) is a discussion of British diet in the eighteenth century. It is mostly based on contemporary diaries, correspondence, and scientific journals. It discusses variation in diet by class and region, and rural versus urban differences. It also deals with diet and health, and pays particular attention to gluttony, epidemics, scurvy, and rickets.

Most of the documents in the collection focus on the first and second parts of the 100 year long Georgian period (1714-1815). Two of the documents are exclusively on London (George 1965, no. 2; Besant 1902, no. 10). The coverage of eighteenth century British life is very good as many of the authors lived during this time and were direct observers. The collection should be particularly useful for political studies, although the complexity of British politics may require searching some of the more peripheral categories in order to be sure of finding all the relevant data. It should also be valuable for studies of eighteenth century urban life, class differences, and the changes resulting from the Industrial and Agricultural Revolutions. There is however, little information on kinship and marriage, which is generally not available in the published literature.

For more detailed information on the context of the individual works in the file, see the abstracts in the citations preceding each document.

Overview by

Teferi Adem

Admiralty Office Use WATER TRANSPORT ( 505) with ADMINISTRATIVE AGENCIES ( 647) and NAVY ( 706)

American Claims Office Use MISCELLANEOUS GOVERNMENT ACTIVITIES ( 659) and AFTERMATH OF COMBAT ( 727)

Apprentices –learning a trade– Use LABOR RELATIONS ( 466) with TRANSMISSION OF SKILLS ( 868)

Apprentices –as a social status or as part of a guild– Use LABOR ORGANIZATION ( 467)

Augmentation Office Use ADMINISTRATIVE AGENCIES ( 647) with RELIGIOUS DENOMINATIONS ( 795)

Bank –references to “the Bank” mean the Bank of England– Use PUBLIC FINANCE ( 652)

Board of Works Use PUBLIC WORKS ( 653)

Boroughs Use TOWNS ( 632)

Burgage Use RENTING AND LEASING ( 427)

Cinque Ports Use PORT FACILITIES ( 504) and ADMINISTRATIVE AGENCIES ( 647)

College of Doctors of Law Use LEGAL AND JUDICIAL PERSONNEL ( 693)

Colonies Use DEPENDENCIES ( 636)

Commissioner of Lunatics Use JUDICIAL AUTHORITY ( 692) with INVALIDISM ( 734)

Commissioner’s Office for the Management of Affairs of the East Indies Use CABINET ( 645) with ADMINISTRATIVE AGENCIES ( 647) and/or DEPENDENCIES ( 636)

Commissioners of Bankrupts Use BORROWING AND LENDING ( 426) with ADMINISTRATIVE AGENCIES ( 647) and LEGAL AND JUDICIAL PERSONNEL ( 693)

Committee for the Letting of the City and Bridge House Estates Use RENTING AND LEASING ( 427) with CITIES ( 633)

Counties Use DISTRICTS ( 634)

Courts of the Admiralty Use SPECIAL COURTS ( 698)

Cursitors Use JUDICIAL AUTHORITY ( 692) with LEGAL AND JUDICIAL PERSONNEL ( 693)

Dispensation Office Use ADMINISTRATIVE AGENCIES ( 647) with RELIGIOUS DENOMINATIONS ( 795)

Districts –e.g., Scotland, and Ireland after 1801– Use PROVINCES ( 635)

Examiner’s Office Use JUDICIAL AUTHORITY ( 692) and LEGAL AND JUDICIAL PERSONNEL ( 693)

First Fruits Office Use ADMINISTRATIVE AGENCIES ( 647) with TAXATION AND PUBLIC INCOME ( 651) or RELIGIOUS DENOMINATIONS ( 795)

Gentlemen Pensioners Use EXECUTIVE HOUSEHOLD ( 644)

Hanaper’s Office Use ARCHIVES ( 217) and/or LEGAL AND JUDICIAL PERSONNEL ( 693)

Herald’s Office Use CLASSES ( 565) with ADMINISTRATIVE AGENCIES ( 647) and HUMANISTIC STUDIES ( 814)

Honorable Artillery Company Use MILITARY ORGANIZATION ( 701)

Jacobites Use POLITICAL MOVEMENTS ( 668) with REVOLUTION ( 669)

Knights of the Garter, Bath, and Thistle Use STATUS ROLE AND PRESTIGE ( 554) or CLASSES ( 565)

Lancaster, Court of the Duchy of Use JUDICIAL AUTHORITY ( 692)

Lieutenancy –His Majesty’s Commissioners of the Lieutenancy for the City– Use CITIES ( 633) with ( 701) MILITARY ORGANIZATION ( 701)

Lord Chamberlain of the king’s household Use EXECUTIVE HOUSEHOLD ( 644)

Office for Auditing Public Accounts Use ADMINISTRATIVE AGENCIES ( 647) with PUBLIC FINANCE ( 652)

Office of the Committee of Council for the consideration of all matters relating to trade and plantations Use DOMESTIC TRADE ( 438) with FOREIGN TRADE ( 439) DEPENDENCIES ( 636) CABINET ( 645) or ADMINISTRATIVE AGENCIES ( 647)

Office of His Majesty’s Mint Use MEDIUM OF EXCHANGE ( 436) or ADMINISTRATIVE AGENCIES ( 647)

Office of Ordnance Use ADMINISTRATIVE AGENCIES ( 647) with SUPPLY AND COMMISSARIAT ( 705) or ORDNANCE ( 713)

Office of Receipt of His Majesty’s Exchequer Use CABINET ( 645) with PUBLIC FINANCE ( 652) or LEGAL AND JUDICIAL PERSONNEL ( 693)

Officers belonging to the Tower of London Use MISCELLANEOUS FACILITIES ( 368) with ADMINISTRATIVE AGENCIES ( 647)

Parishes Use TOWNS ( 632)

Pell Office Use ARCHIVES ( 217) with CABINET ( 645) and/or PUBLIC FINANCE ( 652) with JUDICIAL AUTHORITY ( 692)

Pipe Office Use ADMINISTRATIVE AGENCIES ( 647) with TAXATION AND PUBLIC INCOME ( 651)

Presentation Office Use ADMINISTRATIVE AGENCIES ( 647) with RELIGIOUS DENOMINATIONS ( 795)

Privy Council Use CABINET ( 645)

Privy Seal Use CABINET ( 645)

Queen Anne’s Bounty Use ADMINISTRATIVE AGENCIES ( 647) with PRIESTHOOD ( 793) and/or RELIGIOUS DENOMINATIONS ( 795)

Secretary of State Use CABINET ( 645) with ADMINISTRATIVE AGENCIES ( 647)

Signet Office Use EXECUTIVE HOUSEHOLD ( 644) with CABINET ( 645)

Sion College Use PRIESTHOOD ( 793) with VOCATIONAL EDUCATION ( 874)

Society for the Encouragement of the Arts, Manufacturing and Commerce Use RETAIL BUSINESSES ( 444) with CORPORATE ORGANIZATION ( 473) and/or PHILANTHROPIC FOUNDATIONS ( 741)

Tenth’s Office Use ADMINISTRATIVE AGENCIES ( 647) with TAXATION AND PUBLIC INCOME ( 651) and/or RELIGIOUS DENOMINATIONS ( 795)

Tories Use POLITICAL PARTIES ( 665)

Tower of London Use MISCELLANEOUS FACILITIES ( 368)

Treasury Office Use CABINET ( 645) with ADMINISTRATIVE AGENCIES ( 647) or PUBLIC FINANCE ( 652)

Trinity House Use NAVIGATION ( 502) with WATER TRANSPORT ( 505) or ( 729) WAR VETERANS ( 729)

Victualing Office Use SUPPLY AND COMMISSARIAT ( 705)

Whigs Use POLITICAL PARTIES ( 665)

Yeomen of the Guards of His Majesty Use EXECUTIVE HOUSEHOLD ( 644)

Indexing Notes by

Teferi Adem

Close Box